Atari Falcon030

The Falcon 030 was the last computer

release by Atari.

The Falcon is the only available computer

under 2000 pounds with a DSP. The DSP is independent from the CPU and is

used by many programs to increase speed. With the DSP you can make

32 sound-channels from the Falcon's 8 channels (this is done by realtime calculating

the 32 channels to 8 channels). Other possible tasks for the DSP are

vectorgraphic, simulations and a software-modem/fax.

The graphic-chip of the Falcon is widely programmable: You can use

an extern clock speed to increase the possible screen resolution.

The Falcon has (like the ST) no special video-RAM. Instead of that

the memory needed for the screen will be taken from the main memory.

The advantage is that the Falcon lets no bit of the memory unused, the

disadvantage is the slowness in higher resolutions.

The TOS 4.0 is similar to TOS 2.0x but it allows animated colour-icons

and 3D-effects for windows and dialogues.

The Falcon has a great number of interfaces. For example you can connect

the Falcon to nearly every monitor: TV, RGB, the old SM124 and Multisync-monitors.

Present

The further development of the Falcon030 is done by C-Lab Hamburg. In 1996

they presented the C-Lab Falcon MK-X with an enhanced audio-system and

seperate keyboard. They didn't do anything else with their Falcon license

then. In 1999 Titan Designs announced a PowerPC card for the Falcon.

Links:

Released1992

CPU/Clock speed:MC68030/16 MHz - 32-Bit
DSP56001/32 MHz

ROM:512 KB

RAM:4 (64) MByte

Display:TV/RGB/VGA

Text display:80*25

Resolution:768*576 High Color

Colours:262144

Sound:8 channel Stereo
16 Bit CD sound

Operating system:TOS 4.x

Languages:Basic, C, Pascal, ...

Interfaces:MIDI, 4*Joystick/Paddle, RS232, Kopfh__rer,
Mikrofon, DSP, LAN, Parallel, Seriell

Storage:Disk (eingeb., 3.5"" 1.44MB), Hard disk, CD-ROM

Keyboard:Typewriter

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(C) 2001-2014 by Matthias Jaap. Last update: 31/12/2014.